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Physician Podcasts

Transthyretin amyloid neuropathy has earlier neural involvement but better prognosis than primary

3/3/2017

Dr. Ted Burns interviews Drs. Adam Loavenbruck and Phillip Low about their article "Transthyretin amyloid neuropathy has earlier neural involvement but better prognosis than primary amyloid counterpart: an answer to the paradox?" One hundred one cases of amyloidosis with peripheral neuropathy were identified, 60 primary and 41 transthyretin. Twenty transthyretin cases were found to have Val30Met mutations; 21 had other mutations. Compared to primary cases, transthyretin cases had longer survival, longer time to diagnosis, higher composite autonomic severity scale scores, greater reduction of upper limb nerve conduction study amplitudes, more frequent occurrence of weakness, and later non-neuronal systemic involvement. Four systemic markers (cardiac involvement by echocardiogram, weight loss > 10 pounds, orthostatic intolerance, fatigue) in combination were highly predictive of poor survival in both groups. Their findings suggest that transthyretin has earlier and greater predilection for neural involvement and more delayed systemic involvement. The degree and rate of systemic involvement is most closely related to prognosis. Ann Neurol 2016;80:401-411.



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