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EMG Laws by State

A nonphysican provider’s ability to conduct electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies varies by state law and/or regulations. Because state laws often change, AANEM recommends always checking with appropriate state authorities on scope of practice rules in your provider community. To determine specific legal, governmental, or private criteria that govern the practice of EDX medicine in specific circumstances based on location and provider type, contact your state’s Attorney General, practice board(s), or other appropriate authorities.

This list is intended for informational purposes only – it does NOT represent AANEM’s opinion on who can perform these studies. For AANEM’s opinion, view Who is Qualified to Practice Electrodiagnostic Medicine?

Learn Your State's Laws on Nonphysician Performance of Needle EMGs


Select State:  

Disclaimer:  These laws are up-to-date as of 1/31/17.  State medical boards may have published opinions on who is authorized to perform Needle EMGs; however, oftentimes the state board of chiropractors and/or physical therapists have a conflicting published opinion.  None of the opinions carry the weight of the law.


Alabama

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see The Code of Alabama §34-24-120, for physical therapists §34-24-191.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Alaska

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing physical therapists.  See Alaska Statute §08.84.190.  Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing chiropractors. See Alaska Statute §08.20.230.  However, §08.20.900(5) expressly forbids chiropractors from performing needle acupuncture and also forbids them from performing “surgery” (the definition can be found in Alaska Regulation 12 AAC 16.990 – specifically, (2)(A) “means the use of a scalpel, sharp cutting instrument, laser, electrical current, or other device to incise”).  Therefore, an argument can be made that chiropractors are forbidden to perform a needle EMG.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Arizona

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Arizona Revised Statute §32-925, for physical therapists §32-2001(12).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Arkansas

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing physical therapists.  See A.S.A, § 17-93-102(7).  Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing chiropractors; however, A.S.A. § 17-81-102(6)(B) forbids chiropractors from “…puncturing the skin for the purpose of introducing any substance into the body.”  Therefore, an argument can be made that chiropractors are forbidden to perform a needle EMG.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


California

Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing chiropractors; however, California Code of Regulations, Division 4, Article 1, § 302(a)(4)(A) states that a chiropractor is not authorized, “to practice surgery or to sever or penetrate tissues of human beings….”  Therefore, an argument can be made that chiropractors are forbidden to perform a needle EMG.  Physical therapists are permitted to perform a needle EMG but cannot make a diagnostic interpretation.  See California Business & Professions Code Chapter 5.7, Article 2, § 2620.5: “A physical therapist may, upon specified authorization of a physician and surgeon, perform tissue penetration for the purpose of evaluating neuromuscular performance as a part of the practice of physical therapy, as defined in Section 2620, provided the physical therapist is certified by the board to perform the tissue penetration and evaluation and provided the physical therapist does not develop or make diagnostic or prognostic interpretations of the data obtained.”  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Colorado

Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing physical therapists; however, Colorado Revised Statute, Title 12, Article 41, § 12-41-105(1)(a) forbids physical therapists from performing the practice of medicine and § 12-41-105(1)(b) forbids them the “Use of roentegen rays and radioactive materials for therapeutic  purposes; the use of electricity for surgical purposes or lifesaving measures; or the diagnosis of disease.”  Therefore, an argument can be made that physical therapists are forbidden to perform a needle EMG.  Chiropractors are authorized to perform a SURFACE EMG, but not a needle EMG. See Code of Colorado Regulations, Chapter 3, Rule 7(B).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Connecticut

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Connecticut General Statutes Chapter 372, §20-24 & 20-28, for physical therapists §20-66.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Delaware

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Delaware Code, Title 24, Chapter 7, §701; for physical therapists Delaware Code, Title 24, Chapter 24, §2602.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


District of Columbia

Physical therapists are not permitted to perform Needle Electromyography.  See District of Columbia Municipal Regulation, Title 17, § 6799, which permits physical therapists to perform, “…noninvasive tests of neuromuscular functions as an aid to the detection or treatment of any human condition.”  Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing chiropractors; however, District of Columbia Municipal Regulation, Title 17, § 4811(a)(3) states that chiropractors are permitted to diagnose subluxated vertebrae, “by employing other non-invasive procedures such as MRI and CAT scan.”  Therefore, an argument can be made that chiropractors are not permitted to perform an invasive test such as a needle EMG.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Florida

Physical therapists are expressly permitted to perform Needle Electromyography so long as they comply with the criteria set forth by the Board of Medicine Rule 64B17-6.003.  See Florida Statutes, Title XXXII, Chapter 486, §486.021(11).  Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing chiropractors; however, Florida Statutes, Chapter 460, § 460.403(9)(b) allows chiropractors to diagnoses diseases, “…by the use of any physical, chemical, electrical, or thermal method….”  Therefore, an argument can be made that chiropractors are permitted to perform needle EMGs.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Georgia

Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing chiropractors; however, the 2010 Georgia Code, Title 43, Chapter 9, § 43-9-16(f) states, “Chiropractors shall not use venipuncture, capillary puncture, acupuncture, or any other technique  which is invasive of the human body either by penetrating the skin or through any of the orifices of the body…”  Therefore, an argument can be made that chiropractors are not permitted to perform needle EMGs.  Needle Electromyography is not expressly addressed in the laws governing physical therapists.  See 2010 Georgia Code, Title 43, Chapter 33, § 43-33-3(7).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Hawaii

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors.  See Hawaii Administrative Rules, Title 16, Chapter 76, § 16-76-26(3) and (5); Hawaii Revised Statutes, Title 25, Chapter 442.  Physical therapists are forbidden from performing invasive procedures, defined as, “…the breaking or puncturing of a person’s good skin integrity, for example, through surgery or injections.” 2013 Hawaii Revised Statutes, Title 25, § 461J-2.5.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Idaho

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors.  See Idaho Statute, Title 54, Chapter 7, § 54-704.  Physical therapists are not permitted to order electrodiagnostic studies without the “consultation and direction of a physician.” See IDAPA 24, Title 13, Chapter 01, Section 010, subsection 08(b). AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Illinois

Needle Electromyography is not explicitly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see 225 Illinois Compiled Statute 60/2.  For physical therapists, see 225 Illinois Compiled Statute 90.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Indiana

Chiropractors are prohibited from performing Needle Electromyography.  See Indiana Code 25-10-1-1(1)(C).  Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing physical therapists. See Indiana Code 25-27-1.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.

Iowa

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Iowa Code §151.1; for physical therapists see Iowa Code §148A, Administrative Rule 645-201.1.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.

Kansas

Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing physical therapists, though they are not permitted to make a medical diagnosis. See Kansas Statutes Annotated §65-2901(a). Needle Electromyography is not discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. See Kansas Statutes Annotated §65-2871.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Kentucky

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists. See Kentucky Statute §321.010.  Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. See Kentucky Statute §312.017.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.

Louisiana

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists. For chiropractors, see Louisiana Revised Statute Chapter 37, §2801(3); for physical therapists, see Louisiana Revised Statute Chapter 37, §2407(5). However, in 2004, in Declaratory Statement 04-2, the Louisiana Board of Chiropractic Examiners declared needle EMGs to be in the scope of chiropractic practice. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Maine

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists. For chiropractors, see Maine Revised Statutes, Title 32, Chapter 9, Subchapter 1, §451; for physical therapists, see Maine Revised Statutes, Title 32, Chapter 45-A, §3111-A. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Maryland

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors See Annotated Code of Maryland §3-101. Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists. See Annotated Code of Maryland §13-101. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Massachusetts

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see Massachusetts General Laws Part I, Title XVI, Chapter 112, § 89); however, the Massachusetts Board of Chiropractors has rules that chiropractors are allowed to perform electrodiagnostic studies so long as they have the proper training (see 233 CMR 4.01(b)).  Needle Electromyography is also not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists. See Massachusetts General Laws Part I, Title XVI, Chapter 112, §23A.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Michigan

Chiropractors are prohibited from performing Needle Electromyography.  See Michigan Public Health Code §333.176518.  Physical therapists are expressly forbidden to perform needle EMGs, unless they are one of the three that were “grandfathered” in 2006.  See Michigan Public Health Code §333.176518(3). AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Minnesota

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. See Minnesota Statutes Annotated §148.01.  Needle Electromyography is also not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists; however, physical therapists are not permitted to make a “medical diagnosis.” Therefore, even if they did perform a needle EMG, they would not be permitted to make any diagnosis based on the findings. See Minnesota Statutes Annotated §148.65. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Mississippi

Chiropractors are not allowed to penetrate the skin and, thus, are not permitted to perform a Needle Electromyography.  See Mississippi Code §73-6-1(5). Needle Electromyography is also not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists Mississippi Code §73-23-33. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Missouri

Both chiropractors and physical therapists are permitted to perform Needle Electromyography; however, physical therapists are not allowed to interpret the results of EMGs or NCSs.  For chiropractors, see Missouri Code of State Regulations 20 CSR 2070-2.020(1).; for physical therapists, see Missouri Revised Statutes §334.500(4).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Montana

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Montana Code Annotated §37-12-104; for physical therapists, see Montana Code Annotated §37-11-101(7) and §37-11-104.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Nebraska

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. See Nebraska Chiropractic Practice Act §38-805.  Physical therapists are permitted to perform needle EMGs so long as they as have one of the certifications listed in Nebraska Administrative Code §137-007.01.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Nevada

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists; however, physical therapists are not permitted to diagnose “physical disabilities” so, arguably, they would not be permitted to make a diagnosis from a needle EMG.  For chiropractors, see Nevada Revised Statutes § 634.013; for physical therapists, see Nevada Revised Statutes §640.024.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


New Hampshire

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see New Hampshire General Laws § 316-A:1; for physical therapists, see New Hampshire General Laws § 328-A:2, § 328-A:9.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


New Jersey

Chiropractors and physicals therapists are expressly prohibited from performing Needle Electromyography. For chiropractors, see New Jersey Administrative Code §13:44E-1.1(d)(4); for physical therapists, see New Jersey State Board of Physical Therapy Examiners Public Session Minutes – September 25, 2007 and New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners regulation N.J.A.C. 13:35-2.6(c)1.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


New Mexico

Chiropractors are permitted to perform Needle Electromyography with proper certification.  See New Mexico Administrative Code §16.4.18.8(C)(2). Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists.  See New Mexico Statutes Annotated § 61-12D-3(I).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


New York

Chiropractors are permitted to perform Needle Electromyography. (See New York Education Law §6551 and New York Office of the Professions State Education Department answer to “Electrodiagnostic Testing” Published 06/25/2010, Answer ID 1322).  Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists.  (See New York Education Law §6731).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


North Carolina

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (See North Carolina General Statutes §90-143 and §90-151) or physical therapists (See North Carolina General Statutes §90-270.24(4) and North Carolina Administrative Code §48C.0101) ; however, the Guidelines for the Practice of Chiropractic in North Carolina do permit chiropractors to perform “electro-diagnostic studies” (see I. Scope of Practice, section C) and a Position Statement on “EMG & Nerve Conduction Studies” by the North Carolina Board of Physical Therapy Examiners states that physical therapists may perform EMGs but may not make a “medical diagnosis based on the results.” AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


North Dakota

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see North Dakota Code §43-06-01; for physical therapists, see North Dakota Code §43-26.1(9). AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Ohio

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see Ohio Revised Code § 4734.15 and Ohio Administrative Code § 4734-1-15) or physical therapists (Ohio Revised Code § 4755.40); however, the State Medical Board of Ohio, in its Policy Statement on Electromyography (Policy 26-1997 of the OSMA Policy Compendium), ruled that needle electromyography is the practice of medicine and may not be performed by non-physicians.  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Oklahoma

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Oklahoma Chiropractic Act – Statute §161.2 and Rule §140:1-1-2; for physical therapists, Oklahoma Physical Therapy Practice Act, Title 59 O.S. – Statute §887.2. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Oregon

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see Oregon Revised Statutes §684.010); however, the Oregon Board of Chiropractic Examiner’s “Guide to Policy & Practice” permits chiropractors to perform surface EMGs, but the results must be interpreted by a physician.  Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists. See Oregon Revised Statutes §688.010(6). AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Pennsylvania

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. See Pennsylvania Statute §625.102.  Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in Pennsylvania’s Pennsylvania Physical Therapy Practice Act; however, according to Pennsylvania Administrative Code §40.51, physical therapists are permitted to perform EMGs only upon the referral of a physician and they may not make a diagnosis, but they are permitted to prepare a statement of their “impression.” AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Rhode Island

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see Rhode Island General Laws §5-30-1) or physical therapists (see Rhode Island General Laws §5-40-1(7)).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


South Carolina

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see South Carolina Code of Laws §40-9-10 and South Carolina Code of Regulations §25-5(E)(4)) or physical therapists (see South Carolina Code of Laws §40-45-20(9)).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


South Dakota

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see South Dakota Codified Law §36-5-1) or physical therapists (see South Dakota Codified Law §36-10-18.1).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Tennessee

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. (See Tennessee Code Annotated §63-4-101).  Physical therapists are permitted to perform Needle Electromyography if it is done in a “university academic setting as part of a research project that has been approved by the educational institution’s Internal Review Board without a referral or” it may be performed by a physical therapist with a ABPTS certification upon referral from: an allopathic or osteopathic physician, a dentist or a podiatrist.  (See Tennessee General Rules §1150-01-02(1)(b) and §1150-01-04(4)).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Texas

Chiropractors are prohibited from performing Needle Electromyography. (See Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners v. Texas Medical Assn. (April 5, 2012), Texas Administrative Code Title 22, Part 3 §78.13(c)(2)(D)).  Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists. (See Texas Occupations Code Title 3, Subtitle H §453.005).  However, physical therapists are expressly prohibited from “diagnosing diseases” or “practicing medicine,” therefore they cannot make a diagnosis based on any electrodiagnostic test (See Texas Occupations Code Title 3, Subtitle H §453.006). AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Utah

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. (See Utah Code §58-73-601and §58-73-102).  Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists; however, physical therapists are not permitted to diagnose disease.  Therefore, if a physical therapist were to perform an EMG, he/she is not permitted to make a diagnosis based on the findings.  See Utah Code §58-24b-102(10)(b)(i).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Vermont

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors or physical therapists.  For chiropractors, see Vermont Statutes Annotated Title 26, Chapter 10 §521; for physical therapists, see Vermont Statutes Annotated Title 26, Chapter 38 §2081a(8).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Virginia

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors.  (See Code of Virginia §54.1-2900). Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists (see Code of Virginia, Chapter 34.1, §54.1-3473); however, according to the Virginia Board of Physical Therapy Guidance document 112-14, physical therapists are allowed to perform needle EMGs so long as the test is ordered by a physician and the physical therapist has “specialized, post-professional preparation and training.”  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Washington

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors; however, chiropractors are not permitted to perform “procedures involving the application of sound, diathermy, or electricity.”  Therefore, arguably, they are not permitted to perform a needle EMG. (See R.C.A. §18.25.005(2)).  Physical therapists are permitted to perform needle EMGs only upon referral from an “authorized health care practitioner” (as defined in R.C.W. §18.74.010(7)) and “only upon demonstration of further education and training in electroneuromyographic examinations…” See R.C.A. §18.74.160(4).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


West Virginia

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors. (See West Virginia Code §30-16-3(4)).  Physical therapists are permitted to perform needle EMGs but only under the “supervision of a physician electromyographer and electrodiagnostician.”  (See West Virginia Code §30-20-9(1)).  AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Wisconsin

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see Wisconsin Statute §446.01(2)). However, there are several types of devices that are expressly prohibited. (See Wisconsin Administrative Code §4.05(2)(e)(1)).  For AANEM’s opinion on the requirements of proper EDX equipment see AANEM’s position statement “Electrodiagnostic Study Instrument Design Requirements.” Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing physical therapists (see Wisconsin Statute §448.50). AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.


Wyoming

Needle Electromyography is not expressly discussed in the laws governing chiropractors (see Wyoming Statute §33-10-101) or physical therapists (see Wyoming Statute §33-25-101(a)(i)); however physical therapists are not permitted to make a medical diagnosis or diagnosis a disease (see Wyoming Statute §33-25-101(c)(xi)).  Therefore, if a physical therapist performs a needle EMG, he/she cannot make a medical diagnosis. AANEM's opinion regarding the performance of needle EMGs and NCSs can be found in its position statement “Who is Qualified to Practice EDX Medicine”.

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